GI Procedures

At Advanced Gastroenterology & Surgery Associates, our skilled physicians perform colon cancer screening and other cutting-edge endoscopy procedures to diagnose and treat stomach, bowel, liver, pancreas, and gallbladder diseases. We also perform surgical and non-surgical procedures for the treatment of hemorrhoids.

Learn more about the procedures our physicians perform. Call the Lake County location nearest you for more details and to make an appointment with one of our physicians.

Capsule Endoscopy

This small, ingestible capsule, also called PillCam™, contains a tiny video camera to help physicians diagnose a range of suspected conditions of the small intestine. After you swallow the capsule, it transmits images to a recording device strapped to your waist.

The capsule makes its way through the 20-plus feet of small intestine, pinpointing causes of gastrointestinal symptoms. The capsule takes two images per second of the lower intestine between the stomach and colon.

The doctor then transfers the data from the recording device to a computer for review. The images are clear enough to detect abnormalities as small as one-tenth of a millimeter in size. The capsule is expelled naturally and is a disposable, onetime-use product.

Colonoscopy

A colonoscopy is a procedure that uses a scope to view the inside lining of the entire colon. A scope is a long, thin tube with a light and a viewing instrument that sends images to a monitor.

A scope allows your GI doctor to examine the inside of your colon for cancer, polyps, and digestive or inflammatory disease. It is helpful for determining the cause of bleeding, pain, or changes in bowel habits.

Additionally, a scope is used for taking photographs, obtaining tissue samples for biopsy, surgically removing polyps, or performing specialized laser surgeries.

A colonoscopy is an outpatient procedure. Prior to the colonoscopy, you will be on a clear liquid diet and take a bowel prep to clean out your intestines for the procedure.

EGD Upper Endoscopy

An upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy is a procedure that uses an endoscope to view the esophagus, stomach, and upper duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). This test is also called an esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or a gastroscopy.

An endoscope is a long, thin tube with a light and a viewing instrument that sends images to a monitor. The endoscope allows your GI doctor to examine the inside of the upper gastrointestinal tract for bleeding, tumors, polyps, diseases, and other abnormal conditions. An endoscope can take a tissue sample for biopsy and also treat bleeding.

An upper GI endoscopy is an outpatient procedure. The night before the procedure, you cannot eat or drink after midnight. During the procedure, you are sedated and should not feel anything. Because you will be sedated, you will need someone to drive you home, as you cannot drive for 24 hours after the procedure.

EGD Dilation

If the esophagus becomes blocked, your doctor will perform an EGD with dilation. Dilation is the passage of a tapered catheter or balloon that is used to stretch the narrowed or blocked portion of the esophagus or opening of the stomach into the duodenum.

During the procedure, deflated balloons are placed through the endoscope and across the blockage. When inflated, they stretch and open the blockage, which allows food to once again pass through the esophagus.

An EGD dilation is a simple and quick outpatient procedure. The night before the procedure, you cannot eat or drink after midnight. During the procedure, you are sedated and should not feel anything. Because you will be sedated, you will need someone to drive you home, as you cannot drive for 24 hours after the procedure.

Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)

Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a test that diagnoses and treats disorders of the liver, bile ducts, and pancreas.

A small, thin tube with a video camera (endoscope) is passed through the mouth and guided down the foodpipe. Using a special monitor, your doctor inserts a small catheter through the opening for your liver and pancreas and injects dye to take X-rays.

The endoscope can also treat a disorder at the same time, avoiding the need for major abdominal surgery. For example, if stones are found in the bile duct they can be removed; narrowed strictures can be dilated; and tumors can be biopsied and bypassed with a stent to relieve obstruction.

ERCP is an outpatient procedure that takes 30 to 90 minutes to perform. You will be sedated with an IV prior to the test.

Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

A flexible sigmoidoscopy is a procedure that uses a sigmoidoscope to view the inside lining of the rectum and lower section of the colon. A sigmoidoscope is a thin tube that is about twenty inches long. It has a light and a viewing instrument that sends images to an eyepiece or a video monitor.

The sigmoidoscope allows a doctor to examine the inside of the rectum and lower colon for cancer and polyps. It is also helpful for determining the cause of bleeding, pain, bowel obstruction, or changes in bowel habits. A sigmoidoscope can also be used for taking photographs and/or obtaining tissue samples for examination.

The night before the procedure, you cannot eat or drink after midnight, and on the day of procedure you will receive an enema. During the procedure, you are sedated and should not feel anything. Because you will be sedated, you will need someone to drive you home, as you cannot drive for 24 hours after the procedure.

HALO Ablation for Barrett’s Esophagus

Barrett's esophagus is a serious complication of GERD that is associated with an increased risk of developing esophageal cancer. In Barrett's esophagus, the tissue lining the esophagus – the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach – changes to tissue that resembles the lining of the intestine.

Our GI doctors can treat Barrett's esophagus with a procedure called HALO radiofrequency ablation. The HALO device removes diseased esophageal lining that may develop into esophageal cancer if left untreated.

An endoscope equipped with an electrode is inserted through a catheter into the esophagus. The electrode generates heat, which burns the microscopic layer of the esophagus lining (called Barrett’s tissue), killing precancerous and cancerous cells. Within a month, healthy tissue regenerates in the esophageal lining.

To schedule an appointment, call AGSA at one of our convenient locations in Leesburg, Lady Lake / The Villages, or Clermont, Florida, or request an appointment online.

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